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Historic Whitby Streets Could Get Redevelopment

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Published by Alex Taylor at 11:14am 16th August 2018. (Updated at 5:28pm 16th August 2018)

by Carl Gavaghan, Local Democracy Reporter

Some of Whitby’s most historic streets could soon be getting a 21st century makeover.

Whitby residents are being given the opportunity to have their say on potential improvements to the town centre, including the resurfacing of its iconic shopping precincts.

North Yorkshire County Council’s Highways department is consulting on the plans, though no funding has yet been secured.

It says it wants to “provide a continuity through the streets and the centre of Whitby”.

This will be achieved through “shared surface” arrangements, which will see tarmac through the middle of the streets, with stone flags to the side.

The roads being considered for upgrade are:

  • St Ann’s Staith, from the swing bridge, along Haggestgate and Pier Road to the bandstand
  • Bridge Street, from the swing bridge to its junction with Church Street
  • New Quay Road, from the roundabout at Langbourne Road to the swing bridge

At this early stage, one of the groups that has been consulted is Whitby Civic Society.

In its response, the society said it had concerns but admitted that, under the current arrangements,

“At some times of the year there is a considerable risk to pedestrians under current arrangements. Heavy vehicle use can also cause damage to historic buildings.”

We are very concerned about the risks of shared surface arrangements in New Quay Road and Bridge Street, both of which are not currently viable as shared spaces.

Significant changes in traffic regulations will be required if they are to become viable; and on the basis of experience, it is questionable whether the will and means exist to enforce them.

St Anne’s Staith to the Bandstand is a different case, as traffic controls exist which if implemented could produce a viable shared space.

At the moment this is not the case: none of our members can remember the NYCC bollard on St Anne’s Staith ever being raised, and signage at the entrance to St Anne’s Staith is generally ignored.

This does not inspire confidence in any future implementation of a shared surface design that requires traffic restrictions.”

The county council sent out questionnaires to people in the areas affected.

The local highways office will accept any comments people wish to make over the next few days.

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